Posts for 2019

Self-Care for Farmers, Communication & Finding Balance Discussed During Summer Farmers Union Enterprise Seminar

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When it comes to challenges, we all have the opportunity to choose how we will react. This was one of many relevant messages delivered during the Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Seminar held June 2019 in Wisconsin.  

“Given the planting season we just came off of, it is good to be mindful of that fact that yes, the environment stinks and planting season stinks, but I still make my own decision of how I am going to react to it,” explains De Smet farmer, Rob Lee.

When faced with a challenge, the presenter encouraged agriculture producers to take a moment to reflect on the situation. “Is this an inconvenience or a real problem,” explains Darci Lee, Rob’s wife.


Rob and Darcie represent South Dakota in the one-year program that hosts a farm or ranch couple from each of the following five states: North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Montana. The Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program was developed to substantiate and empower future leaders for rural America and Farmers Union through leadership, citizenship and policy development training.

 In addition to discussing ways to address challenges, communication, self-care and navigating personal and professional balance were also discussed. “This seminar gave us an opportunity to discuss our priorities and how to be better communicators with others and our spouse,” Darcie says.

She adds that they benefited from time spent discussing the topics with other agriculture producers. “It is interesting how even though our operations look much different, we face similar challenges and struggles.”

Tours to a cranberry bog and robotic dairy were also part of the four-day seminar. The cranberry bog is owned by farmers who belong to the Ocean Spray cooperative. And, the robotic dairy is owned by family farmers who milk 160-head of dairy cows.

“Learning about different types of agriculture helped us think outside-the-box,” Darcie explains. “We began talking about ways we can be more efficient on our farm.”

Getting more involved is another take-away the Lees mention. “This program is steering us in a direction to become more comfortable getting involved,” Rob says.

Darcie adds that the first day home, the State Policy Meeting flyer was in their mail. “Before participating in this seminar, I would probably ignore the flyer since the meeting is during the day, on a Wednesday. But now, I feel like we should go and see if we have input to share. Nothing will change in our favor if we do not get involved.”

More about Rob and Darcie Lee

Rob and Darcie raise crops and a small herd of alpaca near De Smet. In addition to the farm, Darcie is a nurse, working at Horizon Health Care Clinic in De Smet and Rob works as a crop insurance adjustor. The couple have two young children, 3-year-old Everett and 9-month-old Rosene.

Rob’s dad, Roger, introduced him to Farmers Union. Rob helped lobby Congressional Leaders on behalf of South Dakota agriculture during the 2018 D.C. Fly-In and then took the policy advocacy skills he gained in D.C. and put them to work during SDFU Legislative Day in Pierre.

Throughout their year of involvement in Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program, the Lee’s will provide members with Union Farmer updates. To learn more about this program and how to get involved, contact Karla Hofhenke at Karla@sdfu.org.

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Get to Know 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honoree, Jeannie Hofer, Huron

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Get to Know 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honoree, Jeannie Hofer, Huron

When Jeannie Hofer explains her work as a volunteer with Manolis Family Safe Center she says, “It’s about accepting and helping and extending a hand and a heart.”

Extending a hand and opening her heart to those in need is second nature for Jeannie, 69, who is grateful an aunt and uncle were there for her, taking her in and raising her when she and her siblings were left without a home due to domestic violence.

The Manolis Family Safe Center is a volunteer organization for victims of domestic abuse and their children. Along with providing victims with a safe place to live, Jeannie and other volunteers take turns buying groceries, cleaning and doing home maintenance, driving family members to counseling and doctor appointments and anything else necessary to “help them feel empowered and in control of their own life,” Jeannie explains. “We give them a new avenue to follow so they don’t have to fall back into the same domestic situation. We can give them guidance to help them make better choices.”

Although she does provide support services to adult victims, Jeannie says her focus is typically the children. “I was one myself. When it comes to domestic violence, children don’t have a choice. Parents do. The children need someone there for them,” Jeannie says. “I encourage them and let them know this is not their fault, and they don’t need to let this experience come between them and their future.”

Even before volunteering for the domestic abuse shelter, Jeannie, a mom to three now grown children, Melissa, Jennifer and Mike, says she and her husband, Wayne, have always had an open-door policy when it came to helping kids. Over the years the couple has opened their home up to several children who needed support or a place to stay.

“I was blessed as a child to have an aunt and uncle who took care of me, so I’ve always wanted to do the same,” she says.

In addition to the Manolis Family Safe Center, Jeannie, who is a small business owner, also volunteers with Coats for Kids, Salvation Army and is an active member of Bethesda Church.

“Huron is where I live. I want to pay back to my community. We have excellent supporters in Huron. Without them, we wouldn’t be able to do what we do,” she says.

More about Rural Dakota Pride

Jeannie is one of five volunteers recognized for their selfless contributions to South Dakota rural communities by South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) with the 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honor August 31, during the 2019 South Dakota State Fair.

“Community is created and maintained through the efforts of volunteers,” explains Karla Hofhenke, SDFU Executive Director.

The other 2019 Rural Dakota Pride honorees include: Angie Mueller, Ethan; Jim Lane, Groton; Rich Bakeberg, Frederick and Franklin Olson, Pierpont.

As an organization which serves South Dakota’s family farmers and ranchers, Doug Sombke, SDFU President, says Farmers Union recognizes the important role strong rural communities play in supporting agriculture producers and their families.

“South Dakota’s agriculture producers and their communities are closely connected. In good economic times they both prosper. When the economy is down, like today with the trade war, low commodity prices and extreme weather conditions, they both feel the pain,” Sombke said. “The Rural Dakota Pride honor is one of many ways SDFU works to show our support for both.”

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Gasolinegate: Three Decades of Flawed Emission Reports Has Endangered Public

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WASHINGTON, DC, July 2, 2019: The 263 million gasoline vehicles on American roadways are emitting significantly more harmful emissions than being reported, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is ignoring the dangers of toxic compounds in gasoline, according to a new report released this week.

Simply titled Gasolinegate, the report (and public service announcement video) was produced by Farmers Union Enterprises (FUE) and according to FUE Chairman Doug Sombke, it chronicles three decades of EPA collusion with the industry they are responsible for regulating, which FUE believes resulted in harming the public they are sworn to protect. Emails obtained through the Freedom of Information Act provide a history of what they call inaccurate testing of fuels and calculations of emissions. The result, FUE says, is much greater risk to the public than reported.

Despite dozens of reputable and peer reviewed studies confirming that ultrafine toxic particulates are one of the most serious public health threats in urban areas, and have been linked to pre-term births, IQ loss, and asthma, not enough has been done, according to Sombke. Dieselgate was about the public health impact of 500,000 cars emitting more emissions than the public was told, and the cover up by Volkswagen by using on board computers as a “defeat device”. Gasolinegate is about 263 million cars and light duty trucks emitting more than reported, particularly more toxic/carcinogenic emissions – for decades. 90% of urban Particulate (PM) emissions come from mobile sources, not power plants, and more than 80% of mobile source PM emissions come from gasoline powered vehicles, not diesel.

Farmers Union Enterprises took on this project to dispel the myths and misinformation that has kept clean burning ethanol out of the market, according to Sombke. “In their relentless effort to block competition, the monopoly of big oil extends to a revolving door policy of the petroleum industry infiltrating EPA, Congress, and other Federal agencies. Our research chronicles a consistent pattern of EPA always siding with the petroleum industry in its rulings and interpretations, failing to recognize Congressional intent and failing to act in the public interest,” said Sombke.

“All we are asking is to make gasoline safe for the public and to open the door to alternative fuels that meet a wide range of public policy goals. EPA has the authority and responsibility to protect public health and has to break the stranglehold of big oil to do its job.”

Related research and information: Safe Gasoline Public Education and Consumer Awareness Campaign Library/Website

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Get to Know 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honoree, Jim Lane, Groton

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When Jim Lane hears his peers make negative comments about “kids these days.” He is quick to disagree.

“I get to work with kids who put an incredible amount of work into their projects. Their work ethic, fortitude and personal drive are why I like volunteering as the robotics coach,” Jim explains, about the Groton High School students who make up the robotics team he has coached since 2011.

Robotics is a unique extra-curricular activity where teens are given the rules of a game, and then expected to build and program a robot to play that game, competing against another robot built by an opposing team. Governed by an international organization, Robotics Education & Competition Foundation, the youth compete on the state level to qualify for regional, national and international competitions.

As the coach, Jim sees his role as practice organizer, supply provider, provider of transportation and teaching youth problem solving skills. “I don’t tell them anything. Robotics is not like basketball or football where the coach tells kids how to play the game,” he says, explaining that when the teens ask him questions, he asks them more questions. “Robotics teaches them how to problem solve by helping them think through issues. All their lives, they will have to solve problems. No matter what they do or where they go, there will be a problem. Whether it is a mechanical problem or a people problem.”

To emphasize his point further, Jim shares a story about a time when the Groton team qualified for a nation competition with more than 350 teams. “Our team was doing very well and close to the top at the end of the first day of matches. Then, their robot broke in last seconds of competition.”

The teens painstakingly took their robot apart, spending hours testing the parts to locate the problem. By 10 p.m. when the facility closed for the night, they were forced to leave their robot, which they still needed to finish putting back together. The next morning, they arrived early to finish putting the robot back together.

The Groton team ended up placing third overall in their division. “They won because they spent the time working on their robot, finding the problem and fixing it.”

Problem solving is something Jim enjoys. It’s a skill that comes in handy. He is a small business owner of a handyman business, Jim of All Trades. “I enjoy projects and I have a curious mind. The things I read for pleasure are Discovery Magazine and National Geographic.”

Jim first got involved in coaching robotics when his son, Logan, was in high school. Logan had been taking a robotics unit and the teacher learned of a competition in Sioux Falls. Logan and some of his friends were interested in participating, but they needed a parent to provide transportation. When the teacher asked Jim, he said, “yes.”

Then, Jim organized some practices…he was hooked. Even after Logan graduated, Jim is still involved.

“I like watching kids take ownership of their robot and the work it takes,” Jim says.

Along with the opportunity to mentor local youth, Jim appreciates the opportunity to give back to the community he’s called home since 1976. “I like the fact it’s a small town and, when my kids were young and running around, people knew who they were and where they belonged. If they got into trouble, people know where to come.”

Jim has five grown children, Jamie Forrest, CJ, Lincoln, Logan and Marshall. In addition to robotics, Jim and his wife, Melodee, volunteer their time in other areas of the community as well. A few years ago, couple dedicated two years to organizing efforts to fundraise and build a warming house for the community ice rink.

To learn more about the Robotics Education & Competition Foundation, visit https://www.roboticseducation.org/.

More about Rural Dakota Pride

Jim is one of five volunteers recognized for their selfless contributions to South Dakota rural communities by South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) with the 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honor August 31, during the 2019 South Dakota State Fair.

“Community is created and maintained through the efforts of volunteers,” explains Karla Hofhenke, SDFU Executive Director.

The other 2019 Rural Dakota Pride honorees include: Angie Mueller, Ethan; Jeannie Hofer, Huron; Rich Bakeberg, Frederick and Franklin Olson, Pierpont.

As an organization which serves South Dakota’s family farmers and ranchers, Doug Sombke, SDFU President, says Farmers Union recognizes the important role strong rural communities play in supporting agriculture producers and their families.

“South Dakota’s agriculture producers and their communities are closely connected. In good economic times they both prosper. When the economy is down, like today with the trade war, low commodity prices and extreme weather conditions, they both feel the pain,” Sombke said. “The Rural Dakota Pride honor is one of many ways SDFU works to show our support for both.”

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SD Farmers Union Celebrates Beitelspacher Farm Family

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By Lura Roti, for SDFU

Mark Beitelspacher followed his heart’s calling when he returned to his family’s cattle and crop operation near Bowdle in 2004, just a few years after college.

“Either your heart is into it, or it isn’t. I’ve always been into the livestock side more than farming,” explains the third-generation cattleman, who also raises corn, soybeans and wheat.

Loving what he does day-in and day-out is important, especially when working conditions were what they were this calving season. “This was the first year, in a long time, that it got so bad with snow that I had to check cattle with a tractor instead of the four-wheeler,” Mark, 43, says. “The death loss on the calf crop during those April blizzards was pretty high this year. And then with the rain this spring, even hauling cattle out to pasture is a challenge.”

At their worst, the blizzards dropped 2 feet of snow on Edmunds County, shutting down Highway 12, which runs right through their farm. Sharon Beitelspacher, Mark’s mom, says she’s never seen a spring like 2019 when the area received a total of 115 inches of snow.

“It just didn’t give up. It kept coming and coming,” says Sharon, who together with her husband, Richard, raised their four children, on the farm where Mark and his wife, Tara, now live and raise their sons, Bryce, 15, and Brady, 13. Mark has two sisters, Krecia and Kindra, and a brother, Lance.

“We are very, very happy Mark is continuing the farm. And his two boys are super great. They are such good helpers. Fun to see them grow up and take on more responsibility and do things that Richard and I used to do,” says Sharon. She adds that raising her children on the farm taught them responsibility and gave them opportunities. “They learned responsibility, yet we had fun times, we were involved in 4-H, and family outings always revolved around livestock shows. To take a resort vacation was not in our plan, it was always structured around livestock shows or Rangeland Days. I remember taking kids to Rangeland Days and learning different grasses. Even today, my daughters still take their kids to Rangeland Days.” 

The couple moved onto the place in the early 1970s. Richard, like Mark, loved cattle and was a purebred breeder. Mark continues to raise purebred Angus and Simmental herds.

“We like the genetics, which are good for implementing into crossbred programs,” explains Mark, who is always working to improve herd genetics. “I breed for lightweight calves. I’m also looking for efficient calves, so they get up and grow fast. Pounds pay, especially when I sell bulls to guys who are selling calves off the cow.”

The family holds an annual sale the final Friday in February every year where they sell 80-90 head of Simm X Angus and Purebred Angus bulls.

When Mark moved back to farm full time 15 years ago, he and his wife, Tara, found a home in town – only 2 miles from the farm.

He rents crop and pasture acres from his parents and they run their cattle together. In 2017, when Richard and Sharon decided, to build a new home, Mark and Tara and their sons moved onto the family’s farm.

“I’m grateful for the opportunity. In my mind, my end goal is to pass the farm onto these two (Brady and Bryce) to keep it going for the next generation,” Mark explains. “We’re still transitioning. The decision-making is all on my shoulders now, but my mom still helps out and does all the cattle records.”

Since they were little, Bryce and Brady have helped out quite a bit. “They are definitely learning skills they would never learn otherwise,” Tara says. “I went out with Bryce a couple times during calving and I thought I’d need to call Mark out to help, but he pulled the calves and took care of everything like a pro.”

Following in their dad’s footsteps, Bryce and Brady enjoy working with cattle and are both avid showman – which means a lot of work year-round, Brady explains. “We get up early to wash and blow our show calves every day.”
 
Their work often pays off. During the 2018 South Dakota State Fair, they received third overall in the 4-H market beef show. Bryce achieved several top five showmanship mentions in the past year, but is most proud of winning the overall showmanship title at the American Royal in Kansas City. His steer was also in the top six – receiving reserve champion in the Division III Category of the Jr. Market Show.

Mark and Tara are both 4-H alumni and currently serve as Busy Bowdle Stars 4-H Club leaders. “We wanted to make sure to offer the opportunity because we were both in 4-H and enjoyed it and learned a lot from it,” explains Tara, who spent her summers growing up traveling from farm to farm throughout Texas, Kansas and Colorado, custom harvesting and completing 4-H projects.

“One year, my sister, Jada, and I each had 60 4-H projects – that is no joke.”

Tara says she gained a lot of communication and business management skills from 4-H, serving as a state FFA officer and watching her parents, Perry and Candice Hoffman, manage the harvesting crew. Today, as the owner of Bowdle and Eureka’s newspapers, The Pride and Northwest Blade, she leads a team of seven part-time employees as they work together to meet weekly print deadlines.

“Those experiences definitely shaped how I work with people,” she says. “My dad had to trust and train a lot of people who were running big equipment – and they were not all in the same area or field.”

Tara and her sister began The Pride in 2007 when the previous owner passed away the year prior and were asked to purchase the Northwest Blade when its owners were ready to retire. “Our local newspapers are like the scrapbooks of the community. Everyone looks to them for history of how a community evolves. Regional papers don’t have the ability or want, to encompass local things that happen in small, rural communities.”

In addition to cattle, the family also raises crops, implementing no-till and other conservation practices like maintaining a crop rotation that includes cover crops. “Dad started no-till because this is sandy soil and it helps conserve as much moisture as we can,” Mark explains.
 
Cover crops build up organic matter and provide extra grazing for their cattle. “Cover crops also help with compaction and water infiltration – especially in a year like this.”

Mark adds that the cattle love turnips, which have large tubular roots that help break up compaction. “They get to be about a foot in diameter. You can’t believe how the cows dig them up to eat them because they love them.” 

To view additional photos of the Beitelspacher family, click here.
 

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FSA Director Speaks on Disaster Relief During S.D. Farmers Union Young Producer Event July 19 and 20

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 Whether you’re a crop or cattle producer, extreme weather and market instability make for a challenging 2019 growing season. S.D. Farmers Union offers young producers an opportunity to gain insight into disaster relief, cattle care and enjoy a relaxing afternoon on the Missouri River during the July 19 & 20 Young Producer Event held at Cedar Shores Resort, Chamberlain.

“This is a good opportunity for spouses to get off the farm or ranch and take some time themselves, learn from experts and network with other young producers,” says Amber Kolousek, who farms with her husband Scott and his parents near Wessington Springs. “Farmers Union does a good job selecting relevant topics. It seems that no matter who you listen to, some speaker hits on something you want to learn more about and you get take-homes that make it worth attending.”

Scott and Amber attended the 2018 Young Producer Event, and Amber said it was refreshing to visit with producers from across the state. “Sometimes farmers feel isolated. It is nice to talk to other people who understand how things are because they farm too. And, maybe they are doing things a bit different than you, so you can learn from each other.”

Supporting young producers is the focus of the annual two-day event, hosted at no cost for members and only $50 for non-members. “Our organization works to provide them with opportunities for education and connection because we know how valuable they are to the future of our state’s number one industry – not to mention our rural communities,” says Doug Sombke, SDFU President. “Today’s young producers are tomorrow’s leaders.”

Speaker & registration information
When organizing the Young Producers Event, SDFU Member Services Coordinator Rocky Forman reflected on current challenges and opportunities and invited experts to address topics including: Paul Shubeck, South Dakota Farm Service Agency Director to discuss Disaster Relief Bill; Michael Oster, Agriculture Advocacy & Telling Your Story; Marty Michalek, First Dakota National Bank, How to Work With Your Banker and Jesse Cruse, Veterinarian, Huron Vet Hospital, Cattle Care. Saturday afternoon will feature a pontoon cruise of the river.

“It’s our hope that producers have an opportunity to ask questions and receive answers that will help them out when they return home. We also hope through this experience they connect with other South Dakota producers and have an opportunity to feel refreshed,” Forman says. “It’s been a tough calving and planting season. We hope this event offers some encouragement as well.”

To attend the July 19-20 Young Producers Event, fill out the registration form found at www.sdfu.org and click on the education tab. Or call Rocky Forman, SDFU Member Services Coordinator at 605-350-3421.

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Get to Know 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honoree, Rich Bakeberg, Frederick

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When the Cenex station in Frederick closed, the closest fueling option was 12 miles away in Ellendale, N.D. So, members of the Frederick Development Corporation began searching for other options.

The plan they finally went with was a creative one. The Development Corporation built a self-service fuel station and lease the facility to Agtegra. The local cooperative takes care of everything else.

“After going without a local gas station for quite a while, this was a big success for us and our community,” explains Rich Bakeberg, volunteer chair of the Development Corporation and a 2019 recipient of South Dakota Farmers Union Rural Dakota Pride honor.

A longtime resident of Frederick, Rich donates his time to projects that help make Frederick a community welcoming to young families. Like he and his wife, Gayle, were when they moved to town to raise their family 44 years ago.

“Our focus is to keep Frederick thriving and growing – any opportunities we can create to get new families to the community we will work to do,” explains Rich, who retired four years ago, and then went back to work part-time when Frederick needed a part-time Maintenance manager.

For more than four decades he has served as a volunteer firefighter and spent 25 years with the volunteer ambulance service. For years he kept score for high school basketball games, and when the school needed a bus driver for away games, Rich passed the test so he could do the job.

“I figured, I have three sons and this way I get to watch every game courtside. I was blessed, we got to watch eight Class B State Tournaments while I was volunteer score keeper,” Rich, a veteran, shares. “Frederick is a good place to live and it was a good place to raise my family, and our school system is terrific. We have smaller class size, so students don’t get lost in the crowd.”

In fact, the Frederick Area School has such a good reputation, students from 30 miles away in Aberdeen choose to open enroll. To make it an easy decision for families, the school funds a bus to pick up and drop off students.

“We hope that some of the students’ families will be impressed enough with Frederick that they want to move here,” he says.

In fact, some student’s families have inquired about moving to Frederick, but housing availability was an obstacle. Fortunately, increasing housing options is another project the Development Corporation has undertaken since Rich joined the board more than two decades ago. Currently the organization manages eight apartments, and this summer they will fund the building of a four-bedroom home.

“I get to work with a lot of great people,” Bakeberg explains. “In small towns, we all need to volunteer and help out wherever we can. For me, Frederick is my number one priority.”

More about Rural Dakota Pride

Rich is one of five volunteers recognized for their selfless contributions to South Dakota rural communities by South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) with the 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honor August 31, during the 2019 South Dakota State Fair.

“Community is created and maintained through the efforts of volunteers,” explains Karla Hofhenke, SDFU Executive Director.

The other 2019 Rural Dakota Pride honorees include: Angie Mueller, Ethan; Jeannie Hofer, Huron; Jim Lane, Groton and Franklin Olson, Pierpont.

As an organization which serves South Dakota’s family farmers and ranchers, Doug Sombke, SDFU President, says Farmers Union recognizes the important role strong rural communities play in supporting agriculture producers and their families.

“South Dakota’s agriculture producers and their communities are closely connected. In good economic times they both prosper. When the economy is down, like today with the trade war, low commodity prices and extreme weather conditions, they both feel the pain,” Sombke said. “The Rural Dakota Pride honor is one of many ways SDFU works to show our support for both.”

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Moody Siblings Push Each Other to Excel in Rodeo

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By Lura Roti, for SDFU

Each summer, South Dakota Farmers Union feeds hundreds of rodeo athletes and their families during the South Dakota High School Rodeo Finals in Belle Fourche. Read on to learn more about one of the many families who will compete during the June 11-16 event.

Peering through the arena fence, 8-year-old Mason Moody couldn’t wait to rodeo.

“I always wanted to be a rodeo cowboy. My older sisters were in the arena and I wanted to be in the arena with them,” explains the youngest member of the Moody family.


After his ninth birthday, he finally got his chance to compete in 4-H Rodeo. Like his three older sisters, Logan, Bailey and Madi, he was hooked.

Now 16, his sisters will be outside the arena cheering him on during the State High School Rodeo Finals. Mason recently qualified to compete in bull riding, team roping and calf roping during the June 11-16, 2019 event held in Belle Fourche.  

“Winning takes a lot of practice and work in our homemade arena,” Mason explains. “Whenever there is a free moment, we saddle up, get on a horse and practice roping.”

In fact, Mason and his sisters spend anywhere from two to six hours each day practicing. And their efforts have paid off. All four siblings have qualified for the National Finals Rodeo. “We are all passionate about rodeo,” says Bailey, 21, a Dakota State University elementary/special education major.

Bailey says rodeo helped her decide on a career focus. “I always knew I would be a teacher, like mom, but it wasn’t until I helped with the Special Needs Rodeo during High School National Finals that I decided to go into special needs,” she explains. “I was paired with a boy named Quinten, a kindergartener. It was an amazing experience. It opened my eyes to the special education world.”

Since that time, Bailey and her mom, Tracy, helped start a Special Needs Rodeo in conjunction with the State 4-H Rodeo Finals.

Although Bailey chose not to rodeo during college, now that she’s home for summer break, she’s practicing to ride barrels in jackpot rodeos.

“You have to be motivated and goal-driven. Some days it would be easy to stay inside and not ride my horse, but if I see my sibling go out there to practice, then I’m not going to stay inside,” Bailey explains.

Her younger sister and recent Sanborn County High School Graduate, Madi, 18, agrees, sibling competition is a motivator. “I’m not going to lie I want to beat Bailey.”

Admittedly competitive, the siblings say succeeding in rodeo has helped them succeed in other areas of their life as well. “Rodeo was one of the things that I was good at, so it gave me confidence in other parts of my life too,” says Logan Hetland, 24, the oldest Moody sibling. Today, Logan is a nurse and lives near Artesian where her husband, Bob, farms fulltime.

And, losing once in a while teaches them valuable life lessons, Tracy adds. “All the kids have let some saddles slip through our hands and because of those mistakes, they’ve learned how to lose and the fact that life goes on.”

“But we get to cry at the trailer for 5 minutes,” Bailey interjects.

“Yes, I always told them they could go pout at the trailer for a few minutes, but then they needed to move on to the next thing because losing is part of life,” Tracy says.

A high school Science teacher, Tracy spends her summers traveling to rodeos with her children. Growing up she didn’t rodeo, but like her children, she grew up riding.

“I grew up on a dairy farm. We had horses and I set up barrels in the pasture and pretended to rodeo,” she says.

And, her husband shares a similar connection to horses. A fourth-generation cattle producer, Perry says he grew up on horseback working cattle. Today, the family continues to use horses to help manage their cow/calf operation. “Horses are more of a tool than a toy on our farm. We use them to move cows, doctor calves, sort cows. We use horses more than four-wheelers. They handle better,” Perry explains. “A cow cannot get away from a good horse.”

For the Moodys, their passion for rodeo stems from a desire to compete and a deep affection for horses or in the rodeo world, their teammate.

“I like how with rodeo, it’s just you and your horse. You develop a huge bond with your horse. Your horse is your team,” Logan explains.

Most of their horses come from their Grandpa Jerry, Perry’s dad. Also a farmer, Jerry makes time to attend every rodeo with the family. “Grandpa is our biggest supporter,” Bailey says.

Jerry enjoys the sport as much as the rest of the family. “Rodeo gives the kids something to do in the summertime where they can have fun competing and learn a bit about what life is about – winning and losing,” explains Jerry.

This summer these truths resonate with Madi. Because, due to a basketball injury – she tore several ligaments in her right knee – she may not be able to compete. “I don’t like even talking about it,” says Madi, fighting back tears. “It’s my senior year and I had so many goals.”

Goal setting is another trait the athletes attribute to rodeo. “Rodeo is the main thing I set goals for,” Madi says. Although she may not be competing this summer, she won’t be missing any rodeos. She currently serves as Student Vice President of the South Dakota High School Rodeo Association – one of the many goals she’s set during her rodeo career.

“It opens a lot of opportunities. It’s an awesome responsibility because we represent every South Dakota high school rodeo athlete, and they are like my family,” Madi explains.

One, big, extended family. That’s how the Moody’s think of other rodeo athletes and their families. “Every rodeo is like camping with your best friends,” Tracy says. “We all support each other.”

And, if you lose, Mason says, his rodeo family is there for him, just like his real family. “Losing with your friends there is OK because they help you get over it, “all right, you got bucked off this one, but tomorrow you’ll get back on and get them.’”

For event schedule and State High School Rodeo Finals details, visit http://www.sdhsra.com/.

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2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honorees Announced

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Volunteers from Ethan, Frederick, Pierpont, Groton and Huron will be recognized for their selfless contributions to South Dakota rural communities by South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) with the 2019 Rural Dakota Pride Honor August 31, during the 2019 South Dakota State Fair.

“Community is created and maintained through the efforts of volunteers,” explains Karla Hofhenke, SDFU Executive Director.

The 2019 Rural Dakota Pride honorees include: Rich Bakeberg, Frederick; Jeannie Hofer, Huron; Jim Lane, Groton; Angie Mueller, Ethan and Franklin Olson, Pierpont.

As an organization which serves South Dakota’s family farmers and ranchers, Doug Sombke, SDFU President, says Farmers Union recognizes the important role strong rural communities play in supporting agriculture producers and their families.

“South Dakota’s agriculture producers and their communities are closely connected. In good economic times they both prosper. When the economy is down, like today with the trade war, low commodity prices and extreme weather conditions, they both feel the pain,” Sombke said. “The Rural Dakota Pride honor is one of many ways SDFU works to show our support for both.”

Get to know an honoree

Empowering girls through running and faith-based principles, Angie Mueller, 40, and her friend, Angie Klock, started the Be{YOU}tiful Strides Running Club in 2015 in Ethan for girls third grade thru sixth grade.

“We wanted to help girls realize that with a little work, encouragement, practice and belief in self, they could do something big,” explains Mueller, who has two daughters, Avery and Sadie and a son, Blake.

The “something big” was train to run a 5K. Beginning when school starts, the Running Club meets at the city park before school two mornings a week. During stretches, Klock leads a character-building, faith-based object lesson and shares the verse for the week, like Matthew 5:16, “Let your light shine.”  Then, they begin run walk intervals together, as Christian tunes play. When their 30 minutes of exercise is complete, the girls together with their teen and adult running mentors walk to school.

“We knew that the only way we could accomplish all our goals was to also focus on Bible truths. We needed God involved too,” says Mueller, who makes fun prizes that help to reinforce the verse to give each girl who memorizes the weekly verse.

To date, 40 girls and five women coaches are involved in Be{YOU}tiful Strides Running Club. Each October, the Running Club ends their season by hosting a Sparkle Run where they put their training to the test and raise money for a cause, like NHim Orphanages, and a community member in need.

As a stay-at-home mom who also works part-time, Mueller says she makes time for Running Club and other volunteer activities like teaching Sunday School and organizing Vacation Bible School for her church because they provide opportunities for her to not only give back to her community, but remain engaged in the lives of her children.

“I wanted to coach my daughters and encourage them to be physically fit. Running Club helps reinforce healthy living and character skills that they can use the rest of their lives,” Mueller says.

To learn more about Running Club, follow them on Facebook, Be{YOU}tiful Strides Runners. And, to learn more about how SDFU supports family farmers, ranchers and rural communities, visit www.sdfu.org.

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Create Fair Markets Here at Home Says S.D. Farmers Union President

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In a recent letter to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Purdue, National Farmers Union President, Roger Johnson, urged on the U.S. Department of Agriculture, (USDA) to ensure the farmer assistance package they were developing in response to escalating Trade War, would “provide fair and equitable relief to all family farmers impacted by disruptions in international markets.”

While S.D. Farmers Union President, Doug Sombke, supports Johnson’s request for a temporary relief package for all commodities impacted by the Trade War, he suggests an additional, urgent need for a long-term, market-fix stateside.

“We need to look at what is going on in our own nation, to understand why our farmers are so reliant upon export markets because we can control what happens within the U.S.,” explained Sombke, a fourth-generation farmer, who like most South Dakota farmers, was dealing with low commodity markets before the Trade War further depressed commodity prices.

Sombke believes the recent gutting of U.S. anti-trust laws, removes U.S. competition for commodities. He points to dissolving governmental oversight agencies, like the 2017 closure of USDA Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, which facilitated the marketing of agriculture products.

“No wonder we are so dependent upon export markets, because although there is demand for our commodities right here at home, our farmers can’t get fair markets within the U.S.,” Sombke said. “We need governmental support to enforce anti-trust laws, to ensure farmers and ranchers can at least market their commodities at prices necessary to cover expenses.”

And, Sombke says there needs to be voluntary protections in place, beyond crop insurance. In April, Sombke, together with South Dakota Farmers Union member, Craig Blindert, a Salem farmer and crop insurance agent, met with Natural Resource Conservation Service and Risk Management Agency staff as well as congressional leaders to advocate for Inventory Management Soil Enhancement Tool (IMSET). A farmer-led solution to poor markets, IMSET was developed by Blindert and tested by North Dakota State University economics professors. The men urged the organizations to consider IMSET, which incentivizes soil health building, as a product for Risk Management Agency to release to farmers to use alongside crop insurance.

“This Trade War magnifies an existing issue – that impacts all commodities – the fact that farmers need a different marketing system. A fair marketing system,” Sombke said.

In a recent letter to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Sonny Purdue, National Farmers Union President, Roger Johnson, urged on the U.S. Department of Agriculture, (USDA) to ensure the farmer assistance package they were developing in response to escalating Trade War, would “provide fair and equitable relief to all family farmers impacted by disruptions in international markets.”

While S.D. Farmers Union President, Doug Sombke, supports Johnson’s request for a temporary relief package for all commodities impacted by the Trade War, he suggests an additional, urgent need for a long-term, market-fix stateside.

“We need to look at what is going on in our own nation, to understand why our farmers are so reliant upon export markets because we can control what happens within the U.S.,” explained Sombke, a fourth-generation farmer, who like most South Dakota farmers, was dealing with low commodity markets before the Trade War further depressed commodity prices.

Sombke believes the recent gutting of U.S. anti-trust laws, removes U.S. competition for commodities. He points to dissolving governmental oversight agencies, like the 2017 closure of USDA Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, which facilitated the marketing of agriculture products.

“No wonder we are so dependent upon export markets, because although there is demand for our commodities right here at home, our farmers can’t get fair markets within the U.S.,” Sombke said. “We need governmental support to enforce anti-trust laws, to ensure farmers and ranchers can at least market their commodities at prices necessary to cover expenses.”

And, Sombke says there needs to be voluntary protections in place, beyond crop insurance. In April, Sombke, together with South Dakota Farmers Union member, Craig Blindert, a Salem farmer and crop insurance agent, met with Natural Resource Conservation Service and Risk Management Agency staff as well as congressional leaders to advocate for Inventory Management Soil Enhancement Tool (IMSET). A farmer-led solution to poor markets, IMSET was developed by Blindert and tested by North Dakota State University economics professors. The men urged the organizations to consider IMSET, which incentivizes soil health building, as a product for Risk Management Agency to release to farmers to use alongside crop insurance.

“This Trade War magnifies an existing issue – that impacts all commodities – the fact that farmers need a different marketing system. A fair marketing system,” Sombke said.

Read Roger Johnson’s letter here:
NFU President Roger Johnson issued the following statement May 15, 2019 in anticipation of the agency’s announcement:

"Family farmers and ranchers have borne the brunt of the trade war with China, which has intentionally targeted American agricultural products with retaliatory tariffs. We appreciate the administration’s recent efforts to relieve the immense economic pressure those in the agriculture industry are feeling as a result.
“Though China’s tariffs have specifically targeted soybeans, pork, and sorghum, many other commodities have been impacted, both directly and indirectly. We ask that trade assistance be offered to producers of all affected commodities, and that payment rates be based on historical production. In addition, we recommend that the USDA address the growing problem of oversupply by providing farmers with incentives to reduce overall production.

“The ever-worsening financial challenges being forced on family farmers and ranchers cannot be overstated. We urge the USDA to ensure that this assistance package provides fair and equitable relief to all family farmers impacted by disruptions in international markets.”

To learn more about S.D. Farmers Union, visit www.sdfu.org.
NFU President Roger Johnson issued the following statement May 15, 2019 in anticipation of the agency’s announcement:

"Family farmers and ranchers have borne the brunt of the trade war with China, which has intentionally targeted American agricultural products with retaliatory tariffs. We appreciate the administration’s recent efforts to relieve the immense economic pressure those in the agriculture industry are feeling as a result.

“Though China’s tariffs have specifically targeted soybeans, pork, and sorghum, many other commodities have been impacted, both directly and indirectly. We ask that trade assistance be offered to producers of all affected commodities, and that payment rates be based on historical production. In addition, we recommend that the USDA address the growing problem of oversupply by providing farmers with incentives to reduce overall production.

“The ever-worsening financial challenges being forced on family farmers and ranchers cannot be overstated. We urge the USDA to ensure that this assistance package provides fair and equitable relief to all family farmers impacted by disruptions in international markets.”

To learn more about S.D. Farmers Union, visit www.sdfu.org.

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S.D. Farmers Union Farm Safety Trailer Receives National Award

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South Dakota Farmers Union Farm Safety Trailer received the Best of National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) Exhibits award during the 2019 NAMA Convention.

“Farm safety education has long been a focus of South Dakota Farmers Union summer camp programming. Because of the mobile nature of the Safety Trailer we are now able to reach more youth, in more communities with farm safety education year-round,” explains Karla Hofhenke, Executive Director of South Dakota Farmers Union, one of South Dakota’s largest farm and ranch organizations.

When designing the 24-foot-long learning space, South Dakota Farmers Union invested in developing creative ways to provide hands-on safety training for high-risk farm activities. They teamed up with Insight Marketing Design to bring their ideas to life.

“It was a challenge to bring all these safety features to life in an engaging way. We loved working with the Farmers Union team to do this,” says Candy Van Dam, partner and chief strategy officer for Insight Marketing Design.

Designed for active learning, the Safety Trailer features an ATV simulator, miniature farm, grain ladder and safety harnesses and more.

“Judged against similar projects, the SDFU Safety Trailer won because of its well thought out strategy to reach rural youth and farm and ranch kids with safety information regarding some of the most dangerous things that can happen on a farm or ranch,” Van Dam says.

To date, more than 7,000 South Dakota youth have engaged with the Safety Trailer.

“Kids learn best by doing. So, we made sure the Safety Trailer invites them to engage in learning about farm safety,” says Rocky Forman, SDFU Member Services Coordinator.

Traveling to communities throughout South Dakota, Forman coordinates with 4-H leaders, FFA chapters, schools and other youth-based community groups to reach as many South Dakota youth as possible.

“Youth are our future, it is an honor when a national organization recognizes the work Farmers Union does to support South Dakota’s youth,” says Doug Sombke, SDFU President. “And, whether they live on a farm or not, because agriculture is our state’s number one industry, there is a good chance they will visit a farm at some point, and they need to understand the dangers associated with farm machinery or ATVs.”

In addition to the Farm Safety Trailer, South Dakota Farmers Union also hosts an annual Farm Safety Quiz Bowl each year during the South Dakota State Fair, where FFA members put their farm safety knowledge to the test, competing for the championship title.

To learn more about South Dakota Farmers Union youth programming, visit www.sdfu.org.

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De Smet Farmers Represent South Dakota during 2019 Farmers Union Enterprises Couples Leadership Program

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De Smet farmers, Darcie and Rob Lee with their
children, 3-year-old Everett and 6-month-old
Rosene. 

As De Smet farmers and young parents who also work off the farm fulltime, Rob and Darcie Lee say it’s not easy to make time for leadership development, but it’s important to their future, so they are making it a priority. The couple will represent South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) as members of the 2019 Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program.

“We can always come up with reasons not to do things. But we accepted the fact that there will never be a good time to give up five weekends, so we prioritized this and we’re going to make it work because it is worth it,” Rob explains.

And, the couple is fortunate to have grandparents living nearby to help care for 3-year-old Everett and 6-month-old Rosene.

The Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program was developed to substantiate and empower future leaders for rural America and Farmers Union through leadership, citizenship and policy development training. Each year, one couple from each of the five state Farmers Union organizations which make up Farmers Union Enterprise, are selected to participate.

Throughout the 2019-2020 year, the Lees will attend five seminars. They will join with farm or ranch couples from North Dakota, Montana, Wisconsin and Minnesota.

“We are both excited about the networking opportunity to get to know other farm and ranch couples,” says Darcie, who is a nurse, working at Horizon Health Care Clinic in De Smet.

“There is value in being around like-minded individuals who you can bounce ideas off one another, and look at things from a different perspective,” says Rob, who along with raising crops, works as a crop insurance adjustor for Precision Risk Management. “We share the same interests and we are working toward the same goal, albeit on different farms – making a living from the farm and keeping it going for the next generation.”

Preserving the family farm for the next generation is a legacy Rob inherited from his dad, Roger. “My dad brought us up telling us, ‘don’t ever sell the farm.’ And, he has worked to pay down the land so that it’s a bit easier on me and my siblings,” Rob explains. “I catch myself thinking this same way and trying to figure out ways to pay off the land so that when Everett is old enough to farm, it’s easy going for him.”

Roger, who has been actively involved in SDFU for decades, introduced Rob to Farmers Union. Rob helped lobby Congressional leaders on behalf of South Dakota agriculture during the 2018 D.C. Fly-In and then took the policy advocacy skills he gained in D.C. and put them to work during SDFU Legislative Day in Pierre.

In addition to gaining leadership and advocacy skills to benefit their farming heritage, Rob and Darcie also enjoy the lifestyle they have living and working on their family farm. They value raising their children on the farm.

“I enjoyed my life growing up on the farm, I could just wander, and my parents knew I was OK. It’s nice to give our kids that kind of lifestyle too,” Darcie explains. “I enjoy seeing the world through our kids’ eyes. Everett gets so excited for the garden. He eats whatever we raise because we grew it in the garden.”

Recently, the couple diversified their farm when they purchased a small herd of alpaca. They plan to raise them for their fiber and provide Everett and Rosene with the opportunity to raise livestock.

Throughout their year involvement in Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program, the Lees will provide members with Union Farmer updates.

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Today is the Day for Yes

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De Smet farmers, Darcie and Rob Lee with their children, 3-year-old Everett and 6-month-old
Rosene. 
By Karla Hofhenke, SDFU Executive Director

“Yes” is a powerful word. And, like De Smet farmer, Rob Lee says, there is no real good time to says “yes.” But the benefits often outweigh the obstacles when it comes to making time for a good cause or purpose you believe in.

In Rob’s case, it is dedicating five weekends, together with his wife, Darcie, to further develop their leadership and advocacy skills as they represent South Dakota as members of the 2019 Farmers Union Enterprise Couples Leadership Program.

“We can always come up with reasons not to do things. But we accepted the fact that there will never be a good time to give up five weekends, so we prioritized this and we’re going to make it work because it is worth it,” Rob explains about the program developed to substantiate and empower future leaders for rural America and Farmers Union through leadership, citizenship and policy development training.

When we ask members of South Dakota Farmers Union why they invest $50 a year and their time participating in policy development at the county and state level or attending Legislative Day or the D.C. Fly-In – the most frequent response we receive is, “as farmers and ranchers, we need a voice, and SDFU gives us this voice.”

And, the state SDFU staff and board of directors work hard to make your voice heard – here in South Dakota as well as in D.C. But, we need your input. Share your thoughts and help us develop policy for 2020 by attending the State Policy Meeting, held in Huron, July 24 at the Crossroads Convention Center (100 4th St SW).

Another great opportunity to share is during the Young Producers Event, held July 19-20 in Oacoma – if you’re a member it’s free and if you’re not, it’s only $50 and that includes a year membership!

Want to learn more, give me a call, 605-352-6763 ext: 114 or e-mail: Karla@SDFU.org.

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S.D. Farmers Union Celebrates Freeman Farm Family

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South Dakota Farmers Union has served South Dakota farm and ranch families for more than a century. Throughout the year, we share their stories in order to highlight the families who make up our state’s No. 1 industry and help feed the world. This month we highlight Mike Miller and Michelle Friesen. The couple have farmed together near Freeman since they married in 1996. They raise corn, soybeans, a cow/calf herd and feeder operation.

by Lura Roti for SDFU

Standing in their pasture, surrounded by cows with their new calves, Michelle Friesen points to a shelterbelt off to the southwest. “My mother grew up on a farm over there, about a year after my parents were married, my grandparents bought this place for my parents and they moved here,” explains the fourth-generation Freeman farmer.

Quick to point out that although she grew up on the farm and spends five days each week actively involved, farming is actually her husband, Mike Miller’s passion. Music is hers.

“My mother says that from 2-years-old on, I begged for a piano,” says Friesen, who is a soprano in the Sioux Falls Symphony Chorus and owns a piano studio, teaching 20 students each week. “I love music. It’s all around us. It’s everywhere you go.”

Before the couple married, she was living in Kansas teaching music and worked as the pianist for a junior college choir and Miller was farming fulltime. She knew marrying him meant she would return to farming, but she also knew he would support her in pursuing music and performing.

“Farming is his passion and this farm is more than what he can do on his own. So, as long as it works for me to do music and perform, I am available to help with farm work three-fourths time,” Friesen says.

Together, the couple raise corn, soybeans, a cow/calf herd and feeder operation. They lease some farmland and pasture from Michelle’s parents, Maureen (Hofer) and Marlyn Friesen, who retired in 2013.

Like Friesen said, farming is Miller’s passion. As a little boy, he remembers making the 50-mile drive from Sioux Falls to his grandparents’ Freeman farm each Saturday so his dad, Max, could help on the family’s farm and farm 80 acres he owned. After his grandpa, Edward Miller, passed away, his family moved to the farm fulltime.

“I always knew I wanted to be a farmer,” Miller explains.

“The family tells a story that one morning they got up and couldn’t find Mike. He was already on the tractor,” Friesen adds.

A while after the story took place, his family suffered a tremendous loss, when his dad was killed in a farm accident.

About that time, Miller began working for a local dairyman, Steve Friesen. “I worked for him all through high school and college. Before I even graduated from high school, he said, ‘you let me know if you want to farm, and I will help you get started,’” Miller recalls.

After college, he took over the lease on a quarter of land his mom, Marlyce, owned and began farming. Steve loaned him equipment and gave him advice. “I couldn’t have gotten into farming without Steve’s help,” Miller says.

“Someday, we’d like to do the same for a young farmer,” Friesen adds.

Conventional crop farmers, the couple implements outside-the-box thinking when it comes to managing their cow/calf herd.

“Efficiencies are the name of the game,” Miller says. “We calve half the herd in the spring and the other half in the fall because I have enough feedlot space for 120 head, but we calve more than 200 head. This way I don’t have to invest in larger facilities.”

Although it’s tough to juggle calving in the spring and fall during planting and harvest, typically, the weather cooperates. However, this spring, due to extreme moisture, Miller says planting is postponed, so they will have most of the calving done before planting begins.

They sell the feeder calves in January and May at auction markets in Worthing or Yankton.

“It’s good to be diversified so we aren’t tied to one commodity, and when that commodity is at a low, then you’re stuck. But, when you have some diversification, the highs in other areas can keep you going,” she says.

Miller uses forward contracting to market their corn and soybeans. “I don’t have to hit a home run, but I have to get on base. My object is not to hit the high of the market, but to avoid the low,” he explains.

Closely connected to their hometown and school, Freeman Academy, they are actively involved in their community. Together, the couple donates their time and equipment to farm a quarter of land that belongs to Freeman Academy. The money raised at harvest helps fund the local Christian school.

They serve as two of 250 Schmeckfest volunteers. Since 1959, Schmeckfest has been an annual festival/fundraiser for Freeman Academy, which serves kindergarten through high school. Running two weekends each spring, the event includes meals and a community play. This year, Friesen was the director of the musical, “The Boyfriend,” a 1920s-era romantic comedy.

“Growing up here I had a lot of people who did a lot for me. I believe in paying it forward and while I’m on this earth I want to be invested in the people who are on it,” she explains.

For more than 17 years, Miller has served on the board of Country Pride Cooperative, he is on the board of the South Dakota Cooperative Association and in 2018, he was elected to serve on the SDFU Board of Directors, representing District 1.

“The more I became involved, starting with our local cooperative, and the more I learned about agriculture in South Dakota, it made me realize, we need to speak up for ourselves,” he says. “We are only 2 percent of the population. Another reason to get involved in Farmers Union, because Farmers Union gives us a voice.”

To view more photos of life on Mike and Michelle's farm, visit www.sdfu.org.

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Celebrate Farm and Ranch Moms This Mothers Day

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As we reflect on the women who raised us this Mother’s Day, South Dakota Farmers Union would like to celebrate the many women who support the state’s No. 1 industry – farm and ranch moms! By Lura Roti for S.D. Farmers Union
Danni Beer 
“I think raising kids on the ranch provides them with a great work ethic. It teaches them so many life skills – you learn so much here. And, they get to grow up see­ing their mom and dad working together. A lot of kids don’t get to see that – for better or worse, our kids see everything.”
— Danni Beer, Keldron, rancher & mother of four


Courtesy photo
Danni Beer Family: Back: Sheldon & Bobbi Froelich, Danni, Mike, Bailie Beer, Carter Honeyman, Bo Beer Front: Blaze Beer, Dogs: Bear & Truman. 

The only constant is change. And, for Keldron rancher, Danni Beer, that’s a good thing.

“Everything is constantly changing. If your operation isn’t changing with the times, or your family isn’t moving forward, something’s wrong,” explains Beer, 48. “I want to make sure the cattle industry stays progressive, not regressive or reactive. I want the same for my family.”

Beer, together with her husband, Mike, and oldest son, Bo, raise cattle and crops on the family’s ranch 20 miles southeast of Lemmon. Growing up on a ranch just across the North Dakota line, Beer always enjoyed ranch work. She knew she wanted to remain in the agriculture industry and pursued an agriculture education degree at South Dakota State University. She also knew she wanted to raise her family on a ranch.

“I think raising kids on the ranch provides them with a great work ethic. It teaches them so many life skills – you learn so much here. And, they get to grow up seeing their mom and dad working together. A lot of kids don’t get to see that – for better or worse, our kids see everything,” says Beer, of their four children Bobbi Froelich, 26; Bo,25; Bailie, 22, and Blaze, 9.

Working on the ranch fulltime, other than a few brief years here and there, Beer says she has enjoyed watching their children learn and grow.

“I have always enjoyed watching them learn new things. And, there are sometimes when the kids teach us more than we teach them. It happens nearly every day with technology,” Beer says. “There are times when I watch my daughter, Bailie, do things on the ranch, and she does things the way I would do them. It’s like having someone who thinks a lot like you do.”

Reflecting on her parenting skills, Beer says she learned a lot from her own mother, Gloria Maher. “She is the perfect mom. She put her kids first in everything. She supported my dad and us kids in everything we did.”

Beer worked to do the same. “Sometimes you just have to drop everything and get them to their activity. And, sometimes they have to learn you can’t do everything. You have to say, ‘no’ to some things,” she says.

In addition to ranch work and children, Beer also gives of her time to the cattle industry. She helped found the U.S. Cattlemen’s Association and served as its president 2014-2016. She remains active in the organization as a board member. “Getting involved in the agriculture industry off the farm or ranch is something you need to do to help direct the future,” she says.

Discussing the future, she says as a mom, she’s enjoyed every stage of her children’s lives. “When the kids were little, helping them with things and now that some are adults, interacting with them as adults.”
Janet Kolousek
“I always thought it would be wonderful to raise
the kids in the country because I felt it taught them
about nature and responsibility.”
— Janet Kolousek, Wessington Springs, farm wife and mother of three

Courtesy photo
Janet Kolousek family: Back row: Amber and Scott (son), daughter Laura, daughter Leah and her husband Jared Richter. Middle: Ella, Abby, Jacob (now deceased), Isaac (Scott’s kids); Shea and Caleb (Leah’s kids). Front: Ed and Judy Carter (Janet’s brother), Janet’s mom Goldie Carter, Janet and Dick Kolousek.
Even before she married a Wessington Springs crop and cattle farmer, Janet (Carter) Kolousek knew when she became a mother, she wanted to raise her children in the country.

“I always thought it would be wonderful to raise the kids in the country because I felt it taught them about nature and responsibility,” explains Kolousek, 67, who grew up on a diversified farm. “I have always enjoyed the wide open spaces and loved going out and hearing birdsong and seeing wildlife, being able to see the stars and moon at night. I just love the land. I love nature. I love creation. And, it’s easy to enjoy all that when you’re in the country.”

Together with her husband, Dick, she did get to raise their three children, Scott, Laura and Leah, in the country, on his family’s Wessington Springs diversified crop and livestock farm.

But, because the family needed health insurance, she used her education as a medical transcriptionist coder and worked fulltime off the farm at a local medical clinic, first in insurance, then as an administrative assistant and, eventually working her way up to serving as office manager for three clinics.

Reflecting on the busy years as a working mom, she doesn’t know exactly how she juggled it all. “Just like every other working mom, I just learned how to get everything done and keep up with the kids’ activities and job responsibilities.”

When the kids were too young to spend time on the farm without close supervision, Dick’s mom, Ione, watched them. “This helped immensely. I knew they were with family. I knew my husband was within a few miles if anything happened and he was needed. The kids got to help grandma with her garden, and with the chicken chores. They learned all kinds of things from Grandma and Grandpa, and that was great for them and for us.”

Semi-retired, today, Kolousek gets to spend a lot of time with grandchildren. Scott farms with Dick, and he and his wife, Amber, live just a half mile away.

“One of the best things about a family farming operation is that the people you work with have the same goals and dreams, and we all love and trust each other,” Kolousek says.

Two of her grandchildren do live in Rapid City, but when they visit, she makes time for all the cousins to play and work together. “I read somewhere that grandma’s is where cousins become friends.

“I think it is a real blessing. I know there are a lot of grandparents whose kids live so far away that they don’t get that quality time together with the grandkids to form that bond between grandparents and grandchildren,” she says.

Reflecting on her parenting years, she relied upon her parents’ example, advice from friends and her faith. “Prayer and faith were the main thing – and talking with other moms, asking how they dealt with this or that.”

Growing up, Kolousek’s mom made sure she and her siblings never missed church. As an eighth-grader, she began to play piano for her church, a tradition she continues today, playing piano for St. Joseph’s Catholic Church.

“Mom really taught us that you need to give of your time and talents – use the gifts God has given you for His glory.”

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South Dakota Farmers Union Encourages You to Read New Report Documenting Connection Between Toxic Fuel Additives, Vehicle Emissions and Human Health Threats

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The Clean Fuels Development Coalition released a report this week (May 7, 2019) indicating that the fuel we use in our vehicles may actually be killing us. South Dakota Farmers Union (SDFU) President, Doug Sombke encourages South Dakotans to read the report and respond by fueling up with E30.

“E30 not only supports the state’s farmers through supporting the ethanol industry, but it replaces the harmful additives, used in gasoline, that this report indicates are cancer-causing,” explains Sombke, a fourth-generation Conde farmer, who in addition to serving as President of SDFU also serves as President of Farmers Union Enterprises, a member of the Clean Fuels Development Coalition.

The report calls emissions from consumer gasoline one of the biggest health threats facing the American public. The report links a wide range of respiratory and even neurological diseases to toxic carcinogenic compounds refiners use to increase octane in gasoline.

“This research makes it clear that mobile source emissions are out of control—literally,” Sombke said. “Current EPA programs and models are faulty and fail to recognize the impacts of real-world fuels. If we did not learn anything from Dieselgate (the Volkswagen emissions scandal), when computers told us all is well when in reality, we were polluting the air, then shame on us because the same thing is happening with gasoline.”

The new Fact Book entitled What’s in Our Gasoline Is Killing Us:  Mobile Source Air Toxics and The Threat to Public Health is the result of research and review of hundreds of studies and medical and technical reports.  The Fact Book was produced by the Clean Fuels Development Coalition (CFDC), in cooperation with the Urban Air Initiative.

The Fact Book documents the alarming rise in air pollution and the direct correlation to increasing concentrations of benzene and other toxic compounds in gasoline that have replaced lead. These compounds have been strongly linked to health issues such as cardiopulmonary disease, lung cancer, breast cancer, asthma, premature birth, low birth weights and even autism.

“Light duty vehicle exhaust emissions are the predominant source of hazardous air pollutants that represent an exposure risk to urban residents and anyone living near a major roadway,” said David VanderGriend, president of the Urban Air Initiative.   “These lethal pollutants can be directly traced to the 25-30% of gasoline additives that petroleum refiners use to increase octane.”

The primary carcinogen in gasoline is benzene, part of the family of toxics termed as “aromatics”.  Benzene is classified as a known carcinogen.  The American Petroleum Institute as long ago as 1948 testified before Congress that there was no safe threshold for benzene.  The other aromatic compounds in gasoline are toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene are suspected carcinogens.  This combination of aromatics is referred to as BTEX.

Download a copy of the Fact Book here, or request hard copies at no charge by contacting CFDCinc@aol.com.

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Advocate for Safe Air – Sign This Petition

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By Doug Sombke, SDFU President & fourth-generation South Dakota farmer

As farmers who have advocated for ethanol for nearly four decades, we understand the impact higher ethanol blends can have on our farm economy.

Higher ethanol blends, like E30 would create $42 billion in economic activity to sustain the agricultural-based economies in the United States by increasing demand for corn by 5 billion bushels.

However, have you given much thought to the impact higher ethanol blends, like E30, can have on the air we breath and our children’s health?

Research shows, the additives in fuel are proven carcinogens. Yup, Benzene, Toulene, Ethyl Benzene and Xylene - they all cause cancer, and we’re all breathing them in! And, these additives CAN be removed from gasoline if higher ethanol blends are added to gasoline.

In fact, if these harmful additives were removed from gasoline and replaced by higher ethanol blends, it would decrease premature deaths by 50,000 – because 50,000 deaths in the United States are associated with pollution from transportation fuels.

What can you do? Sign the Make Gasoline SAFE! Petition, launched by the Clean Fuels Development Coalition asking the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to remove cancer-causing additives from gasoline.

Please sign today. Simply click here

Want to learn more, watch this video and share it with your friends: Do You Know Jack? Part 1@ https://youtu.be/NURz10BLaaI.


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How to Help Your Friends & Loved Ones When Challenges Impact Mental Health?

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It’s no secret that markets are down … for the third consecutive year in a row. And, the weather is less than cooperative. So, what do you do when financial stress or other factors out of our control catches up to a friend, loved one or you?

South Dakota Farmers Union reached out to experts to find out.

Don’t wait to get help. If a friend or loved one has diabetes or high blood pressure and their current diet or medications aren’t working, you wouldn’t tell them to “pull themselves up by their bootstraps and get over it.” More than likely, you’d suggest they meet with their doctor.

The same thoughtfulness should apply when a neighbor or family member is struggling with anxiety or depression, explained Karl Oehlke, a Physician Assistant with Avera Medical Group University Psychiatry Associates.

“You can’t just grit your teeth and bear it. If you have pneumonia, I will prescribe an antibiotic for you. If you have sleep disturbance, I will give you something for sleep. Farming is never without stress. Right now, farmers are faced with a lot of stressors out of their control, which may be causing bonafide anxiety or depression. A medical professional can provide medication or counseling options to help with that too,” Oehlke said.

Oehlke speaks from experience. He is a third-generation Hartford farmer. In fact, Oehlke is concerned enough over farmers and ranchers’ mental health due to magnified stressors, that he suggested Avera launch the Farmer’s Stress Hotline.

Completely confidential and free, farmers, ranchers, their family and friends can call in 24/7 to visit with trained specialists to better understand where they can go for help. The Farmer’s Stress Hotline number is: 800-691-4336.

Signs you or a loved one needs mental health support

So, how do you know if someone you know, or love is battling anxiety or depression? Andrea Bjornestad, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Mental Health Specialist shares some symptoms to watch for among family and friends:

  • Depression, hopelessness
  • Withdrawal from people or activities they ordinarily enjoy
  • Negative thoughts, including frequent talk about disappearing or death
  • Strong feelings of guilt or low self-esteem
  • Decline in hygiene or appearance
  • Alcohol or substance misuse
  • Stockpiling medication
  • Easy access to firearms

And, Bjornestad said if you see the above symptoms or assume someone is struggling, don’t hesitate to get involved. “If you see someone struggling, socially withdrawing, behavioral changes, don’t hesitate to ask them if they are thinking about killing themselves,” Bjornestad said. “Don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions. You asking will not impact a person’s response or thoughts.”

Approaching a friend or family member to discuss their mental health is not easy, Bjornestad offers some advice for this as well. She suggests talking to the person alone and in a private location.

“It is important to describe any changes you’ve observed in the person and to let them know that you care about them,” Bjornestad says. “After describing changes, you may need to ask tough questions directly including, “Have you had any recent thoughts of death and dying?” or, “Are you experiencing thoughts of suicide?’” 

If the answer is yes, the following resources are important:

  • Help the person get immediate mental health assistance.  Offer options such as the Helpline (dial 211) or Farmers Stress Hotline numbers; call a family member to come help and potentially take the person to the hospital; call a local mental health crisis team; call for emergency medical services. Do not leave the person alone.

 

“Remember, there are so many things right now that farmers and ranchers cannot control. We can’t control the prices. We can’t control the weather. But you can control whether or not you reach out for help to treat anxiety or depression symptoms,” Oehlke said. “By asking for help, farmers and ranchers are not only helping themselves, but they can help those around them. As farmers, we may not realize how many people we touch. Not only the many people we help feed, but our friends and family members are connected to our actions as well.”

For more information, call the Avera Farmer’s Stress Hotline at 800-691-4336 or Avera.org/FarmerStress, or contact Bjornestad at 605-688-5125 or andrea.bjornestad@sdstate.edu.

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Farmers Don’t Have to Suffer or Lose Sleep – Ask Professionals for Help

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By Lura Roti for S.D. Farmers Union

If a friend or loved one has diabetes or high blood pressure and their current diet or medications aren’t working, you wouldn’t tell them to “pull themselves up by their bootstraps and get over it.” More than likely, you’d suggest they meet with their doctor.

The same thoughtfulness should apply when a neighbor or family member is struggling with anxiety or depression, explained Karl Oehlke, a Physician Assistant with Avera Medical Group University Psychiatry Associates.

“You can’t just grit your teeth and bear it. If you have pneumonia, I will prescribe an antibiotic for you. If you have sleep disturbance, I will give you something for sleep. Farming is never without stress. Right now, farmers are faced with a lot of stressors out of their control, which may be causing bonafide anxiety or depression. A medical professional can provide medication or counseling options to help with that too,” Oehlke said.

Oehlke speaks from experience. He is a third-generation Hartford farmer. “I farm myself, so I know that typical stresses are heightened right now, with concerns over significant fall off in profitability caused by issues with China, flooding and drought. And, the loss of income is pervasive right now. It’s not just the row crop guy or the dairy guy, it’s everyone in agriculture.”

In fact, Oehlke is concerned enough over farmers and ranchers’ mental health due to magnified stressors, that he suggested Avera launch the Farmer’s Stress Hotline.

Completely confidential and free, farmers, ranchers, their family and friends can call in 24/7 to visit with trained specialists to better understand where they can go for help. The Farmer’s Stress Hotline number is: 800-691-4336.

“There is a level of trepidation about going to the doctor for anxiety or depression. And, if you live in a small community, maybe you go hunting or to church with your primary care doctor and you’d rather keep things confidential. Call the hotline and we can refer you to someone outside your community,” Oehlke explains.

A professional, Oehlke explained, can provide farmers or ranchers with the medicine and other resources they need to get a good night’s sleep or more healthfully deal with depression and anxiety.

“When I visit with farmers who call in, I hear the words, “fear” and “anxiety,” quite a bit,’” Oehlke said. “When you’re not making money, you start to lose sleep because you’re worried about getting the kids through school or, as a third, fourth or fifth generation farmer, you don’t want to be the guy who loses the farm.”

And, unfortunately, lack of profits is currently an issue for many South Dakota farmers and ranchers, explained Nate Franzen, President of Ag Banking Division of First Dakota National Bank. “If you look across the agriculture landscape, it’s been really tight, with low commodity prices, a lot of volatility in the markets and livestock. It’s a tough environment to make money,” Franzen said.

Two years ago, 52 percent of First Dakota National Bank’s agriculture customers made a profit. Whereas, four years ago 60 percent of agriculture customers made a profit. “Tough economic times in agriculture are tough on everyone. It not only wears on farmers and ranchers, it wears on lenders, and others who serve them,” Franzen said. “The ag industry is a close group of folks, with lots of great leaders. We will be fine as long as we lean on each other, and we are there for each other.”

Signs you or a loved one needs mental health support

So, how do you know if someone you know, or love is battling anxiety or depression? Andrea Bjornestad, Assistant Professor & SDSU Extension Mental Health Specialist shares some symptoms to watch for among family and friends:

  • Depression, hopelessness
  • Withdrawal from people or activities they ordinarily enjoy
  • Negative thoughts, including frequent talk about disappearing or death
  • Strong feelings of guilt or low self-esteem
  • Decline in hygiene or appearance
  • Alcohol or substance misuse
  • Stockpiling medication
  • Easy access to firearms

And, Bjornestad said if you see the above symptoms or assume someone is struggling, don’t hesitate to get involved. “If you see someone struggling, socially withdrawing, behavioral changes, don’t hesitate to ask them if they are thinking about killing themselves,” Bjornestad said. “Don’t be afraid to ask the tough questions. You asking will not impact a person’s response or thoughts.”

Approaching a friend or family member to discuss their mental health is not easy, Bjornestad offers some advice for this as well. She suggests talking to the person alone and in a private location.

“It is important to describe any changes you’ve observed in the person and to let them know that you care about them,” Bjornestad says. “After describing changes, you may need to ask tough questions directly including, “Have you had any recent thoughts of death and dying?” or, “Are you experiencing thoughts of suicide?’” 

If the answer is yes, the following resources are important:

  • Help the person get immediate mental health assistance.  Offer options such as the Helpline (dial 211) or Farmers Stress Hotline numbers; call a family member to come help and potentially take the person to the hospital; call a local mental health crisis team; call for emergency medical services. Do not leave the person alone.

“Remember, there are so many things right now that farmers and ranchers cannot control. We can’t control the prices. We can’t control the weather. But you can control whether or not you reach out for help to treat anxiety or depression symptoms,” Oehlke said. “By asking for help, farmers and ranchers are not only helping themselves, but they can help those around them. As farmers, we may not realize how many people we touch. Not only the many people we help feed, but our friends and family members are connected to our actions as well.”

For more information, call the Avera Farmer’s Stress Hotline at 800-691-4336 or Avera.org/FarmerStress, or contact Bjornestad at 605-688-5125 or andrea.bjornestad@sdstate.edu.

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FUE Led Coalition Calls on EPA to Go Beyond E15

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HURON, S.D.  A broad coalition of farm, ethanol, and clean fuel advocates today called on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to open the market to a wider range of fuels in order to provide consumers with healthier choices.

 

Farmers Union Enterprises filed comments with EPA following the agency's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to extend the current reid vapor pressure allowance to blends of 15% ethanol in gasoline. While applauding the proposal, the commenters challenged EPA on their limiting the rule to just 15% and presented a detailed legal and technical argument as to why higher blends are permissible.

 

FUE President Doug Sombke said if the rule is finalized as proposed it would limit the broader use and availability of ethanol, contrary to the intent of Congress when it established several programs to cap toxic carcinogens currently in gasoline. Higher blends could achieve that goal, according to Sombke, such as E30 which has been successfully used in South Dakota and is planned to be demonstrated by both South Dakota and Nebraska state fleets.

 

The comments support EPA's finding that E15 is substantially similar to E10 in all respects but oppose the proposed requirement that any blend above E15 would be required to apply for similar approval.

 

""EPA continues to rely on outdated and biased historical models and studies that penalize ethanol," said Sombke.  "With the designation of E10 as a certification test fuel, the time has come to put ethanol on equal footing with other fuels and additives.  Higher volumes of ethanol reduce vapor pressure, dilute toxics and sulfur, and provide low carbon, clean octane.

The proposed rule does not meet the objectives of existing law, Congressional intent, and fails to recognize best available science."

 

Joining Farmers Union Enterprises on the comments are the National Farmers Union, South Dakota and Nebraska Farmers Union, Urban Air Initiative, Clean Fuels Development Coalition, and Glacial Lakes Energy.

 

"EPA is doing the right thing, but not enough of the right thing.  If we are forced to file new applications for higher fuel blends and wait nearly ten years like we did with E15,  the ethanol industry, and the agriculture industry that supplies it, will be severely damaged and is likely to never grow beyond the depressed levels we are seeing now," said Sombke.

 

Copies of the FUE Coalition comments can be accessed at the South Dakota Farmers Union website at www.sdfu.org. Comments can also be found on the National Farmers Union website at www.nfu.org, and the Clean Fuels Development Coalition at www.cleanfuelsdc.org.

 

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